Exam Queries

As you know, the written exam will be some time in the assessment period at the end of semester 1 (as this is timetabled by the exams office, I don’t have the exact date yet). We will talk through the exam in some detail in week 12. Before leaving any queries here, please remember that there is a list of Exam FAQs on blackboard (in the Assessment folder). That resource is likely to have everything you need. Feel free to bring any additional queries here.

6 Comments

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6 responses to “Exam Queries

  1. Alexandra Andow

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    I’m a little confused about the Prague Declaration. I don’t understand why recognising Communism and Nazism as a common legacy would lead to the rehabilitation of collaborative governments. Surely the Declaration would have meant associating these governments with the Nazis, so having the opposite effect?

  2. Ian Biddle

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    Hi Alexandra
    Many thanks for your question/comment. I see where you are coming from. And, indeed, on the face of it, this ‘common’ legacy seems an utterly fair and decent proposal. But, as I said in my lecture, the best way to judge any ‘policy’ or ‘ideology’ is to judge it by its consequences, and the consequences of it have been devastating to the recognition of Jewish suffering in the Holocaust. Critics of the Prague Declaration do not want to diminish other groups’ suffering under, say, Stalin and the Soviet Union, but they are asking for the specifics of the Holocaust to be given appropriate attention, and they are also asking for similar attention to be paid to other groups who suffered greatly. In other words, the declaration denies that each group should have the right to represent their suffering as specific, unique, as owned by that group and dealt with by that group. The point here is that what has followed from the ‘common legacy’ argument is kind of graying out of the specifics. And what has followed from that (and some have argued that this was indeed was the original intention of the declaration) has been a removal of anything specifically Jewish from commemoration plaques or other memorials (this has happened time and time again in Lithuania, for example); for many Jews and their relatives the declaration is a way of covering over collaborators’ crimes by saying ‘we are all victims’. In graying out the issues in this way, critics of the declaration argue, collaborators can hide behind ‘shared guilt’ and ‘shared victimhood’. Does this answer your question?

  3. Alexandra Andow

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    Thank you that makes it a lot clearer!

  4. Ian Biddle

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    There are some new comments, relevant to the exam, here:
    https://musicintheholocaust.org/2012/10/09/lecture-2-semester-2/

  5. Ian Biddle

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    Another recent query that came to me via email:

    Hi Ian,
    I was just wondering, on the slides for the Zamlerkultur lecture you have used the abbreviation JCHC – is that for the Central Jewish Historical Commission? And should it be written JCHC, or CJHC? Or is it something else?

    Sorry, just been getting a bit confused about it.

    My answer:

    Great question!

    Both are correct: in Polish, the adjective usually comes after the noun – hence to apparently strange positioning of the J

    Does this help?

  6. Ian Biddle

    [please note: this comment is now out of date and was posted in relation to the 2012-13 delivery of this module; please check any advice given here against the latest version of the module documentation]

    Another query recently sent to me via email:

    Hi Ian,

    I was just wondering if you could clarify something for me. Is Theresientstadt a camp or a ghetto as when researching online it is coming up as both. Thank you for taking the time to read this email.

    Best Wishes,

    My answer:

    Hi

    It’s really both: in a way it’s a hybrid of the two since it’s an old town turned into a camp/ghetto. Not exactly clear but it foes mean you can revise it as both one of your camps and one if your ghettos for section C.

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